EcoEarth.Info Home

EcoEarth.Info

Environment Portal & Search Engine

Empowering the Environmental Sustainability Movement

Environment Search


EcoEarth.Info News Archive

Non-profit environment news links and archive of materials no longer on web provided on these terms to help find solutions and for posterity

Rate | Printer | Disclaimer & Conditions for Use | Share on Facebook |

Arctic thaw may slow crackdown on toxic chemicals

Source:  Copyright 2009, Reuters
Date:  May 4, 2009
Byline:  Alister Doyle
Original URL: Status ONLINE


A thaw of the Arctic linked to global warming may slow a drive to get rid of industrial chemicals that are harming indigenous people and wildlife, an expert said on Monday.

About 150 nations are meeting in Geneva this week to consider adding nine chemicals, including pesticides and flame retardants, to a "Dirty Dozen" banned by a 2001 U.N. pact partly inspired by worries about the fragile Arctic environment.

But an Arctic melt may be complicating the clean-up even though levels of some of the "dirty dozen" chemicals are falling in the region, said Lars-Otto Reiersen, Executive Secretary of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP).

"There's some good news and some bad news," he told Reuters.

The shrinking of summer sea ice may allow some of the dirty dozen persistent organic pollutants (POPs), long trapped under sea ice, to evaporate into the atmosphere and so spread further around the polar region, he said.

Continue to Read Full Article at Source



Rate Article: 1 (Worst) to 10 (Best)

 



Related News

5/5/2009 - Arctic thaw may slow crackdown on toxic chemicals, Reuters  [search]

8/5/2008 - Scientists find toxic chemicals in penguins, Telegraph  [search]

30/1/2006 - Greenland: Greenland: Love in a very cold climate, Independent  [search]

8/5/2001 - Climate News Compilation, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)


More related news


Search the Internet with EcoEarth.Info's Search Engine for more information on: 'Arctic melt toxic chemicals'

EcoEarth.Info users agree to the site disclaimer as a condition for use.